Lyse Links: Killers, Interrogation, and Paradise


Welcome to November! Lean into the coziness. These stories are a great way to occupy the cold darkness. (Also, light some candles. Or a fire. That helps.)

I didn’t sort today’s stories into sections. They read really well into each other and defy categorization. *shrug*

Pair Seven Days of Heroin Epidemic with A Prayer for Healing to get both a big-picture and very personal look at addiction.

The Sorrow and Shame of an Accidental Killer — How do you move past killing someone?

From Prison to PhD — Michelle Jones used her 20+ years in prison to become a respected scholar. Applying to graduate schools upon release, she’s sparked controversy at top universities. How should a person’s crimes affect public perception of them after they’ve served time? Is society unfairly prolonging their punishment?

The Newspaper That Bought a Bar — a great story of undercover journalism. Also an example of the type of shenanigans that I doubt would be successful in today’s tech-heavy world.

Big Business Got Brazil Hooked on Junk Food — Many underdeveloped nations have gone from underweight to malnourished as food giants aggressively market unhealthy foods. How do you begin to fix a problem like this?

Pair The Scientists Persuading Terrorists to Spill Their Secrets with CIA Torture Black Sites for a look at changing opinions on interrogation techniques. Psychology tells us the first method is more likely to be effective, but it’s tough to change established patterns. The articles also deal with a fascinating aspect of interrogation–it’s extremely difficult for the interviewer. Traditional interrogation techniques are heavy on actions that make the imprisoning party feel good, but that’s effective for getting good information.

Golden State Warriors Revolution Starts with a Charcuterie Board — For something a bit lighter, the story of how Steve Kerr revolutionized the Warriors’ offense. I haven’t watched a single Warriors game and somehow I know more about them than any other basketball team.

Mattress Wars — You may not find this as interesting as I do, but it’s an intriguing business story. Are you inundated with podcast ads for Casper or Leesa? Behind the scenes is more complicated than you could imagine. (Also a good read if you’re interested in how bloggers/Internet influencers legally and successfully build brand relationships. It’s a changing world.)

How the Elderly Lose Their Rights — This is one of the scariest stories I’ve read in awhile. I’ll let this excerpt speak to why:

Parks drove a Pontiac G-6 convertible with a license plate that read “crtgrdn,” for “court guardian.” In the past twelve years, she had been a guardian for some four hundred wards of the court. Owing to age or disability, they had been deemed incompetent, a legal term that describes those who are unable to make reasoned choices about their lives or their property. As their guardian, Parks had the authority to manage their assets, and to choose where they lived, whom they associated with, and what medical treatment they received. They lost nearly all their civil rights.

The Paradise that Shouldn’t Exist — Cape Coral was built on lies. It’s a disaster waiting to happen. And it’s also one of the fastest-growing towns in America.

I felt oddly guilty reading this, because we moved to Florida this year. We’re smack-dab in the middle of a top-risk flood zone. But honestly, I’d think long and hard about leaving. People aren’t motivated by flood risks and ecological concerns. They’re drawn by this:

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Literally just my local park. There are half a dozen like it in 10 miles. 

The Mother of Forensic Science — Finally, the woman who introduced forensic science to police officers in the 1940s.

Let’s Talk!

What’s your favorite story? Do you disagree with any of them? Tell me in the comments.

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Lyse Links: conspiracy theories, overachievers, and Confucius


Do I say I have great articles for you every time I post these? Because I really love these. I even eliminated a few that were interesting, but not quite up to snuff. Categorized for easier skimming, but they’re ALL worth reading, I promise.
(Oh, and there’s a quick question at the end. Could you do me a favor and pop down to answer it? Thanks :D)

Humor

Conspiracy Theorists Use Twitter to Yell at Mars Rover — this will make you shake your head. But it’s good to be reminded how people outside our circles think. And I’m guessing hoping none of you are in that circle.
My Fully Optimized Life — McSweeney’s piece on living an optimized life. 😀
How to Survive Hard Times as a Copywriter — also McSweeney’s. This one hits home…

Living Your Best Life

Incrementalism is OK — for overachievers especially, it’s hard to remember that small gains are ok, even good. This interview with Robb Wolf was a good reminder for me.
How I Got a Second Degree in 2 Years While Working Fulltime — really, I couldn’t not read this. While I have an ambivalent relationship with this kind of extreme achievement, this guy seems pretty balanced and he has lots of good advice. (If you want my less-polished version, drawn from personal experience doing extreme things, check this out.)
I Gave Up TV, Then Qualified for the Olympic Marathon Trials, and Got My PhD — Again, I have very mixed feelings. I’ve suffered some psychological backlash from pushing myself hard and I also don’t like the way we (as a culture) have started fetishizing streamlined lives and accumulated accomplishments. But I do support people testing these ideas in their own lives.
Can a Harvard Professor and Confucius Change Your Life? — I think this article is most interesting for the way that you can watch non-religious people hungering for many of the principles of a religious life. If you’re interested in self-improvement, this is an important read.

Thought-Provoking

Because I’m a Girl — I have nothing to say about this. Read it.

Trusting Your Fat Friend — You should read this whole piece, but the major takeaway for me was Continue reading

Lyse Links: Instagram, Hamilton, running, and mental illness


What have you read this week?

 

Lyse Links: ALL the Controversy


And since I missed another week of posts, this is also long! Enjoy the wiiiiiiiiiiiiide variety of interesting stories here!

  • The Amazing Thing We Do During Conversations – Interesting for language and communications enthusiasts. Also, explains part of why speaking a non-native language fluently is so difficult.
  • The Poor are Better Off When We Build Housing for the Rich – Just the title was enough to make me interested, but this is vital for anyone who is following arguments about gentrification.
  • What Causes Resilience? – A cool quote from this article:
    “(Indeed, Werner found that resilient individuals were far more likely to report having sources of spiritual and religious support than those who weren’t.)”
  • Your Parmesan Cheese is Wood – the title I’ve chosen is only a slight exaggeration.
  • The Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens – in case you don’t know, Tumblr is the place for the geeky teens. It’s generally hilarious and often the genesis of the most popular memes. I’m always interested in people who are successful on social platforms, so this was a fascinating story for me.
  • A Compulsive Con Man – I’m fascinated by pathological deception. This guy had so many different identities that they had difficulty discovering his real name.
  • Radiolab – this is slightly different, but I’m newly obsessed with the Radiolab podcast. It’s basically long-form journalism for audio and it’s pretty fabulous.

That’s all! What do you think? What have you been reading? Let me know in the comments!