Book Review: The Road Back to You


The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery
Ian Morgan Cron & Suzanne Stabile
Non-fiction

The Enneagram of Personality is a 9-point or 9-type approach to understanding human personality and behavior. It is often called simply “the Enneagram,” but I find it interesting to note that an enneagram is a geometrical figure.

Anyway. This specific book explores the Enneagram types through a Christian worldview, offering insight into how each type functions and can improve on their weaknesses, or “sins.” Continue reading

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24/30 Book Review: Upstairs at the White House


Upstairs at the White House: My Life with the First Ladies
J.B. West with Mary Lynn Kotz
Nonfiction/memoir

Summary

J. B. West, chief usher of the White House, directed the operations and maintenance of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue—and coordinated its daily life—at the request of the president and his family. He directed state functions; planned parties, weddings and funerals, gardens and playgrounds, and extensive renovations; and, with a large staff, supervised every activity in the presidential home. For twenty-eight years, first as assistant to the chief usher, then as chief usher, he witnessed national crises and triumphs, and interacted daily with six consecutive presidents and first ladies, as well as their parents, children and grandchildren, and houseguests—including friends, relatives, and heads of state.

J. B. West, whom Jackie Kennedy called “one of the most extraordinary men I have ever met,” provides an absorbing, one-of-a-kind history of life among the first ladies. Alive with anecdotes ranging from Eleanor Roosevelt’s fascinating political strategies to Jackie Kennedy’s tragic loss and the personal struggles of Pat Nixon, Upstairs at the White House is a rich account of a slice of American history that usually remains behind closed doors.

Old and Relevant

Upstairs at the White House was first published in 1973, but it’s still a fascinating read. It’s surprising readable even if you don’t know/care much about history and politics. You’ll learn a lot about how the White House functions and you’ll probably laugh at surprising antics of the staff and executive families.

West is a consummate professional throughout the book, careful not show favoritism or reveal any serious indiscretions. He is an archetypal butler, clever, competent, and occasionally inscrutable. The breadth of his responsibilities at the White House is breath-taking and it seems a wonder that such a huge organization continues to function with such grace.

A highly recommended read for nearly anyone.

19/30 Book Review: Working Stiff


Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner
Judy Melinek & TJ Mitchell
Nonfiction/memoir

Summary

Just two months before the September 11 terrorist attacks, Dr. Judy Melinek began her training as a New York City forensic pathologist. While her husband and their toddler held down the home front, Judy threw herself into the fascinating world of death investigation—performing autopsies, investigating death scenes, counseling grieving relatives. Working Stiff chronicles Judy’s two years of training, taking readers behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple, including a firsthand account of the events of September 11, the subsequent anthrax bio-terrorism attack, and the disastrous crash of American Airlines Flight 587.

Fascinating Field

I knew very little about forensic pathology or the work of a medical examiner before reading this book. I wouldn’t say I know a lot now, but Continue reading