What To Do About Failure?


Failure is a loaded topic. /my understatement of this year/ But I’m not scared of loaded topics (are you scared of loaded topics?), so let’s tackle it!

I see two common discussion points on failure: shame and reclaiming. Continue reading

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Why I Read Romance (+book rec!)


babyI re-read Nobody’s Baby But Mine again last night. I’m not sure how many times that makes, but probably more than 3, at least.

I’m reluctant to re-read romances. I often feel like reading romance is a gross binge that I don’t want to look at too closely on the other side, like the cheap chocolate I might gorge in a funk, only to realize that it’s objectively disgusting when I’m not a complete mess. Continue reading

Lyse Links: Secrets, Sharapova, and Slam Poetry


How’s your weekend going? Maybe it will be better with the perfect mix of funny, informative, and intriguing long reads. Here’s the best of what I’ve read recently.

The Age of Attention-Deficits — This is a great look at how technology is designed to create addictions. Mixing humor and science, the author lays out the distracted patterns of our tech obsession. Follow up with her article about living better and actually TRY some her recommendations. It’s surprisingly difficult to moderate or break a notification addiction.

Continue reading

Book Review: Committed


Committed_Book_CoverTitle: Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage
Author: Elizabeth Gilbert
Page Count: 279
Genre: Memoir/Non-Fiction

I’ve been on a bit of an Elizabeth Gilbert kick since reading Eat, Pray, Love (see here and here), so my next two reviews are also Gilbert books. It is too simple to say that I’m reading more of her work because I like her. She has an interesting voice. I’m fascinated with the leap she made as an author and with the spiritual peace she has found. She puzzles me more than I like her. And she is a good writer — her stories are compelling and her prose is thoughtful and precise.

So, Committed. It’s basically a follow-up to EPL, Continue reading

An anecdotal birthday present


My father’s birthday was this week. I missed it, because I’m at college. If I were home, I would have given him a hug. I’m not a daddy’s girl, but I do miss those sometimes. But since I am here, I am going to write instead.

I never considered my parents to have much to do with my reading, particularly my taste in books. Looking back now, obviously I see a lot more of it, but it is true that for the most part, I chose a lot of the things I read. However, in the last year or two, I have realized that my dad affected my taste in reading quite a bit. As a kid, one of the only things I knew how to talk about was books. So I was constantly talking about what I was reading, and then regularly pestering my parents for any suggestions of books to read. On one such occasion, my dad suggested Lloyd Alexander’s books. I took his suggestion, and as my title evidences, they became favorites of mine. I have read everything of Alexander’s that I can get my hands on (well over half his writings) and loved every moment. Somewhere in the train of my adolescent history, I forgot that my dad lit that spark. When I remembered, it became something precious, a point of connection that we seldom make, and certainly never vocalize.

My father also started me on sci-fi. He suggested Fahrenheit 451 and Isaac Asimov. I read and loved both. From there, I continued to read science fiction. He also suggested Brave New World, which I still remember and will still read at some point.

If you asked me today what my favorite genre was, my answer would likely be either fantasy, or fantasy/sci-fi, since sometimes they blend together inseparably in my mind. In either case, I have to acknowledge that my father probably started me on the path to loving both genres. That is something for which I am unspeakably grateful – small moments that have shaped me in innumerable ways.

Chances are, he doesn’t even realize the impact his book suggestions had on me. He may not even remember suggesting them. But I do. For that, I thank him very much.